Posts Tagged 'peace'

Lent: Our Peace

Lent: Our Peace Sermon Audio Here

Romans 5:1-11

I’ve been noticing new construction around our town. Have you ever considered all the parts that go into the construction of a permanent dwelling? Jesus said He’d prepare a place for us – we haven’t “moved in” yet, but what do we already have right now?

What Parts of Peace Do We Have?

Present Terms of Peace ~ Romans 5:1-5

  • v1 NOT “we must make peace” but “realize that you already HAVE peace”; this is not a call to cessation of conflict with God – this is an encouragement to let us know that God has already granted us peace because of our being made just according to HIS will
  • v2 access INTO grace? Faith is a VERB here; when we USE our faith, we enter into the grace we’ve been given. Example: a builder constructs a house to specifications, but we have to walk INTO the house to take possession of what we own “on paper”
  • v3/4 suffering leads to perseverance, and then character, and then hope
  • v5 we hope for God’s love; our hope is REALIZED because of the presence of the Spirit; once we recognize our hope, we give God glory in response

Perfect Timing for Peace ~ Romans 5:6-11

  • v6/7 “right time” Kairos; God’s timetable, not ours
  • v8 God gave us what we needed BEFORE we knew we needed it: Christ’s atoning death
  • v9 Jesus’ sacrifice fulfills God’s covenant with us
  • v10 Every blessing we have is because we are connected to Christ. His death paid our price; His Resurrection pulls us into Eternal Life
  • v11 “have now received” Both PRESENT AND FUTURE

“Behold, I will stand before you there on the rock at Horeb, and you shall strike the rock, and water shall come out of it, and the people will drink.” And Moses did so, in the sight of the elders of Israel. ~Exodus 17:6

God stands before us in our times of trouble with His solution. He has already provided everything you need for peace; you just have to recognize it.

Advertisements

St. Patrick’s Day thought

As I write this, it’s St. Patrick’s Day. Granted, I understand that in America, everyone is “Irish” on St. Patty’s Day; however, I actually *do* have Irish background. I’m also a history buff, and I’m a Protestant, so I am wearing a brightly colored tie with both green and orange with a white shirt. (I figure that I’ve got all my bases covered now…)

Anyway, I was doing some reading, and I came across this blog, which had a very interesting entry about social justice and the work of the church.

Ten Marks of the Church as Abbey

It’s a wonderful post about how a church can envision its outreach to the surrounding culture by understanding the functions of the Celtic Abbey. I’d especially like to draw your attention to point number 9, about justice:

Peace and justice. St. Patrick was the first person in recorded history to speak out against the Irish slave trade.  Patrick’s appeals eventually resulted in the end of the Irish slave trade, of which Patrick himself had been a victim.  Patrick also prevailed upon the Irish kings and warlords to live in peace with one another, as much as they were able.  The abbey bears that same responsibility today.

The serendipity of it all makes me smile: here I am, on St. Patrick’s Day, reading about the work of the church as modeled by St. Patrick. And me being an Orange-wearing Protestant.

As they say in the Guinness commercials… “Brilliant!”

  1. Peace and justice. St. Patrick was the first person in recorded history to speak out against the Irish slave trade.  Patrick’s appeals eventually resulted in the end of the Irish slave trade, of which Patrick himself had been a victim.  Patrick also prevailed upon the Irish kings and warlords to live in peace with one another, as much as they were able.  The abbey bears that same responsibility today.

Relax already! (from archive)

(DATE: December 5, 2007)

Ah! The holidays! The season of joy, the season of cheer, the season of…

I don’t know about you, but I’ve got WAY too much on my plate right now for me to even think about kicking back and enjoying the Christmas season. Isn’t this supposed to be the time where we have “PEACE on earth, goodwill toward humanity”?Well, the thing about peace is this: it only has meaning in the midst of conflict. Peace without war is meaningless; peace without strife is nothing.

In order for us to experience peace, we need to add patience to our peace. Not just putting up with stuff, but truly letting go of our attempts to control our own destiny.

Jesus said, “Take my yoke upon you, and learn from me; for I am gentle and humble in heart, and you will find rest for your souls.” (Matthew 11:29)

The stress that we so often experience isn’t from being too busy, or having too much to do near as much as it’s about trying to CONTROL what’s going on in our lives.

News flash: We’re not in control!

That’s what Jesus is reminding us in this verse. The yoke was a harness that hooked up a more experienced ox with a young ox who didn’t know what it was doing. Jesus knows what He’s doing; He’s in control. Really.

And us? Well, we’re dumb oxen. Sorry to put it to you like that, but there it is. We don’t know the way; we just like to THINK that we do.

So, RELAX. Let Jesus drive your life, and He’ll take the lead. He knows where He’s going. Let’s just do our best to follow Him.


Pastor Ed Backell

Flickr Photos

Pastoral Tweets

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 781 other followers


%d bloggers like this: