Posts Tagged 'justice'

Learning from Luke: Justice by the Pound

Learning from Luke: Justice by the Pound Sermon Audio Here
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Luke 18:1-14

In this sermon title, “by the pound” refers to the woman pounding on the door of the unjust judge late at night. We can and should DEMAND justice; of ourselves, each other, and the world itself.

As We Seek Justice, Remember:

Even the unjust can do just things
Luke 18:1-8

  • v1 we’re told the lesson at the start: don’t give up in prayer
  • v2/6 notice the unjust judge gives into persistence
  • v7 God has His justice in mind the whole time
  • v8 Will WE keep God’s justice in our minds?

We are not the source of Justice
Luke 18:9-14

  • v9 we’re told the warning at the start: self-righteousness ISN’T
  • v10/12 “I’m not like other men” is a LIE to SELF
  • v13 the counter-truth: I need you, God!
  • v14 God sees our admission of need as JUST; we agree with HIM

when we lower ourselves, we can raise God up in us. Lift Him up so all may see God and be saved! (John 3:14)

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Whatever is Right

Whatever Is Right Sermon Audio Here
the Whatevers of Philippians 4:8

2 Thessalonians 1:1-7

A socialist once came to see Andrew Carnegie and soon was railing against the injustice of Carnegie having so much money. In his view, wealth was meant to be divided equally. Carnegie asked his secretary for an assessment of everything he owned and at the same time looked up the figures on world population. He did a little arithmetic on a pad and then said to his secretary. “Give this gentleman l6 cents. That’s his share of my wealth.”

What is “fair” and what is JUST/RIGHT are not the same thing…

What are the Roles of Righteousness?

Righteousness as a State

  • Ps. 14:1-3 – we are not natively righteous
  • Rom. 3:9 – We are corrupt TOGETHER; spoiled by sin

Righteousness as a Measure of Inner Condition

Righteousness as Judgment

  • Ps. 9:7-8 – God alone can correctly judge
  • 1 Jn. 1:9 – God’s forgiveness is justified because of Christ’s work

Righteousness as a Lifestyle

  • Gal. 3:11 – Abraham lived by faith BEFORE the Law was given
  • Rom. 1:17 – we live in given righteousness; “Carl Sagan apple pie”

Righteousness as A Gift

  • Isa. 45:13 – what will be given to me by God?
  • 2 Tim. 4:8 – crown signifies victory; Jesus wins, we benefit!

Righteousness Because of Christ

  • 1 Pet. 3:18 – Jesus’ righteousness IS for our reconciliation
  • Rev. 16:5 – God alone has the necessary perspective to judge

Jesus alone is ultimately righteous. Therefore, when we allow Him to fill our thoughts, our thinking itself becomes transformed.

St. Patrick’s Day thought

As I write this, it’s St. Patrick’s Day. Granted, I understand that in America, everyone is “Irish” on St. Patty’s Day; however, I actually *do* have Irish background. I’m also a history buff, and I’m a Protestant, so I am wearing a brightly colored tie with both green and orange with a white shirt. (I figure that I’ve got all my bases covered now…)

Anyway, I was doing some reading, and I came across this blog, which had a very interesting entry about social justice and the work of the church.

Ten Marks of the Church as Abbey

It’s a wonderful post about how a church can envision its outreach to the surrounding culture by understanding the functions of the Celtic Abbey. I’d especially like to draw your attention to point number 9, about justice:

Peace and justice. St. Patrick was the first person in recorded history to speak out against the Irish slave trade.  Patrick’s appeals eventually resulted in the end of the Irish slave trade, of which Patrick himself had been a victim.  Patrick also prevailed upon the Irish kings and warlords to live in peace with one another, as much as they were able.  The abbey bears that same responsibility today.

The serendipity of it all makes me smile: here I am, on St. Patrick’s Day, reading about the work of the church as modeled by St. Patrick. And me being an Orange-wearing Protestant.

As they say in the Guinness commercials… “Brilliant!”

  1. Peace and justice. St. Patrick was the first person in recorded history to speak out against the Irish slave trade.  Patrick’s appeals eventually resulted in the end of the Irish slave trade, of which Patrick himself had been a victim.  Patrick also prevailed upon the Irish kings and warlords to live in peace with one another, as much as they were able.  The abbey bears that same responsibility today.

Pastor Ed Backell

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