21st Century Theological Declaration of Barmen for the United States of America

Originally written by Karl Barth and the confessing church in Nazi Germany in response to Hitler’s national church, it is adapted for today’s political climate in the United States. Its central doctrines concern the sin of idolatry and the lordship of Christ

I. An Appeal to the Evangelical Congregations and Christians in America

History of the original Barmen Declaration: The Confessional Synod of the German Evangelical Church met in Barmen, May 29-31, 1934. Here representatives from all the German Confessional Churches met with one accord in a confession of the one Lord of the one, holy, apostolic Church. In fidelity to their Confession of Faith, members of Lutheran, Reformed, and United Churches sought a common message for the need and temptation of the Church in their day.

With gratitude to God they were convinced that they had been given a common word to utter. It was not their intention to found a new Church or to form a union. For nothing was farther from their minds than the abolition of the confessional status of their Churches. Their intention was, rather, to withstand in faith and unanimity the destruction of the Confession of Faith, and thus of the Evangelical Church in Germany.

In opposition to attempts to establish the unity of the German Evangelical Church by means of false doctrine, by the use of force and insincere practices, the Confessional Synod insisted that the unity of the Evangelical Churches in Germany came only from the Word of God in faith through the Holy Spirit. Thus alone is the Church renewed.

Current Response to the original Barmen Declaration: The original work contained three calls to action to the German people. These calls for action are equally applicable to the American people today:

1) The Call for Prayer: the Barmen Declaration challenges congregations to range themselves behind it in prayer, and steadfastly to gather around those pastors and teachers who are loyal to the [historical] Confessions [of the Christian faith].

2) The Call for Caution: the Barmen Declaration cautions Christians to guard themselves, to not be “deceived by loose talk, as if we meant to oppose the unity of the… nation! Do not listen to the seducers who pervert our intentions, as if we wanted to break up the unity of the [followers of Christ in this country] or to forsake the Confessions of [that faith]!

3) The Call for Discernment: this word of warning within the Barmen Declaration challenges people of faith to “Try the spirits whether they are of God!” As followers of Jesus Christ, we should carefully examine any teachings from any church to see whether they agree with Scripture and with the historical traditions of that faith.

  • Be careful of any sudden changes in doctrine: “If you find that we are speaking contrary to Scripture, then do not listen to us! But if you find that we are taking our stand upon Scripture, then let no fear or temptation keep you from treading with us the path of faith and obedience to the Word of God, in order that God’s people be of one mind upon earth and that we in faith experience what he himself has said: ‘I will never leave you, nor forsake you.’ Therefore, ‘Fear not, little flock, for it is your Father’s good pleasure to give you the kingdom.’” 

II. Theological Declaration Concerning the Present Situation of the American Church

History of the original German Churches responsible for the Barmen Declaration: According to the opening words of its constitution of July 11, 1933, the German Evangelical Church was a federation of Confessional Churches that grew out of the Reformation and that enjoyed equal rights. The theological basis for the unification of these Churches was based on both the gospel of Jesus Christ, and the recognition of individual church freedom within their shared organization.

Declarations from the original Barmen Declaration: The original work contained three declarations by these member churches. These statements are equally valuable for the American people today:

1) The Declaration of Unity: the Barmen Declaration stated its intent to stand together on the grounds of classic evangelical faith as an organization of churches. It reminds us even today that we are bound together by the confession of the one Lord of the one, holy, catholic, and apostolic Church.

2) The Declaration of Diversion:  the Barmen Declaration stated that shared common belief in the core concepts of the gospel of Jesus Christ were being challenged by outside influences from the surrounding culture. There were ideologies incompatible with classic Christian thought that were being inserted, sometimes forcefully, into their practice of faith.

  • Be careful of any alterations in principle: “This threat consists in the fact that the theological basis, in which the… church is united, has been continually and systematically thwarted and rendered ineffective by alien principles, on the part of the leaders and spokesmen of…  [those in government who would subvert the church for their own ends]. When these [nationalistic] principles are held to be valid, then, according to all the Confessions in force among us, the Church ceases to be the Church..”

3) The Declaration of Assertion: the Barmen Declaration stated that they must assert what they know to be true, according to their faith. “We may and must speak with one voice in this matter today. Precisely because we want to be and to remain faithful to our various Confessions, we may not keep silent, since we believe that we have been given a common message to utter in a time of common need and temptation.”

4) The Confession of evangelical Truths: the writers of the Barmen Declaration felt that their faith was under attack. To answer these unwanted concepts from those who would subvert their faith on behalf of governmental influence, they held that the following confessions of faith were crucial:

1. “I am the way, and the truth, and the life; no one comes to the Father, but by me.” (John 14.6). “Truly, truly, I say to you, he who does not enter the sheepfold by the door, but climbs in by another way, that man is a thief and a robber. . . . I am the door; if anyone enters by me, he will be saved.” (John 10:1, 9.)

  • Jesus Christ, as he is attested for us in Holy Scripture, is the one Word of God which we have to hear and which we have to trust and obey in life and in death. 

  • We reject the false doctrine, as though the church could and would have to acknowledge as a source of its proclamation, apart from and besides this one Word of God, still other events and powers, figures and truths, as God’s revelation. 

2. “Christ Jesus, whom God has made our wisdom, our righteousness and sanctification and redemption.” (1 Cor. 1:30.)

  • As Jesus Christ is God’s assurance of the forgiveness of all our sins, so, in the same way and with the same seriousness he is also God’s mighty claim upon our whole life. Through him befalls us a joyful deliverance from the godless fetters of this world for a free, grateful service to his creatures. 

  • We reject the false doctrine, as though there were areas of our life in which we would not belong to Jesus Christ, but to other lords–areas in which we would not need justification and sanctification through him. 

3. “Rather, speaking the truth in love, we are to grow up in every way into him who is the head, into Christ, from whom the whole body [is] joined and knit together.” (Eph. 4:15,16.)

  • The Christian Church is the congregation of the brethren in which Jesus Christ acts presently as the Lord in Word and sacrament through the Holy Spirit. As the Church of pardoned sinners, it has to testify in the midst of a sinful world, with its faith as with its obedience, with its message as with its order, that it is solely his property, and that it lives and wants to live solely from his comfort and from his direction in the expectation of his appearance. 

  • We reject the false doctrine, as though the Church were permitted to abandon the form of its message and order to its own pleasure or to changes in prevailing ideological and political convictions. 

4. “You know that the rulers of the Gentiles lord it over them, and their great men exercise authority over them. It shall not be so among you; but whoever would be great among you must be your servant.” (Matt. 20:25,26.)

  • The various offices in the Church do not establish a dominion of some over the others; on the contrary, they are for the exercise of the ministry entrusted to and enjoined upon the whole congregation. 

  • We reject the false doctrine, as though the Church, apart from this ministry, could and were permitted to give itself, or allow to be given to it, special leaders vested with ruling powers. 

5. “Fear God. Honor the emperor.” (1 Peter 2:17.)

  • Scripture tells us that, in the as yet unredeemed world in which the Church also exists, the State has by divine appointment the task of providing for justice and peace. [It fulfills this task] by means of the threat and exercise of force, according to the measure of human judgment and human ability. The Church acknowledges the benefit of this divine appointment in gratitude and reverence before him. It calls to mind the Kingdom of God, God’s commandment and righteousness, and thereby the responsibility both of rulers and of the ruled. It trusts and obeys the power of the Word by which God upholds all things. 

  • We reject the false doctrine, as though the State, over and beyond its special commission, should and could become the single and totalitarian order of human life, thus fulfilling the Church’s vocation as well. 

  • We reject the false doctrine, as though the Church, over and beyond its special commission, should and could appropriate the characteristics, the tasks, and the dignity of the State, thus itself becoming an organ of the State. 

6. “Lo, I am with you always, to the close of the age.” (Matt. 28:20.) “The word of God is not fettered.” (2 Tim. 2:9.)

  • The Church’s commission, upon which its freedom is founded, consists in delivering the message of th free grace of God to all people in Christ’s stead, and therefore in the ministry of his own Word and work through sermon and sacrament. 

  • We reject the false doctrine, as though the Church in human arrogance could place the Word and work of the Lord in the service of any arbitrarily chosen desires, purposes, and plans. 

The Confessional Synod of the German Evangelical Church declared that it saw in the acknowledgment of these truths and in the rejection of these errors the indispensable theological basis of the German Evangelical Church as a federation of Confessional Churches. It invited all who were able to accept its declaration to be mindful of these theological principles in their decisions in Church politics. It entreated all whom it concerned to return to the unity of faith, love, and hope.

A similar hope is offered to the churches of Christian faith in the United States of America. As people of faith, we reject any effort by outside forces to dictate how we are to practice that faith. Like the originators of the Barmen Declaration, it is also declared that American Christians should carefully consider these theological principles as they conduct the workings of their churches and their individual faith.

A PDF of this document is available for download here.

Advent: Preparing for the Last Day

Advent: Preparing for the Last Day Sermon Audio Here

Romans 13:11-14

How do we prepare for the first day of school? How do we prepare for the LAST day of school? What’s the difference? The unknown experience!

How Will We Prepare For The Last Day?

Adjust to God’s Agenda ~ Isaiah 2:1-5

  • v2/3 God will teach us His ways
  • v4/5 God will judge & we will respond with peace ((if our world isn’t peaceful, we’ve got a ways to go))

Wake Up & Get Dressed ~ Romans 13:11-14

  • v11/12 wake up from the darkness
  • v13/14 get dressed for the Day

Matthew 24:36-44 leads us to ask: “When will it happen?” God only knows. SO – keep watch. Be ready. Remind each other as we wait that He will come.

Prayer Practicum: Intercessory Prayer

Prayer Practicum: Intercessory Prayer Sermon Audio Here

John 17:1-9

DIY Network is gone from my channel list! Why? It was only a “preview”; have to subscribe to get the real thing!

To Build Our Practice of Intercessory Prayer,

Know the Equation of Faith ~ John 17:1-9

  • v1/2 Jesus prayer: God be glorified through OUR salvation
  • v3/7 knowing AND showing=glowing (glory)
  • v8/9 accept Word + knowledge + faith = understand we’ve been chosen (the subject of Jesus’ prayer)

Show the Magnificent Model ~ Exodus 17:8-13

  • Picture Moses, watching from the hilltop, praying for his people. Who was fighting the battle, and how? The earthly battle was fought with muscles & blood, with weapons of war. The prayer battle was fought with willingness to stand together, and determination to stay before the presence of the Lord until He answered!

Read Romans 8:34 and Hebrews 7:25

  • Now consider this: what does Jesus do now? The same thing that Moses did for Israel: He stands for us, now and forever!

Grow in Persistence That Wins ~ Luke 18:1-8

  • Jesus gives a parable of persistence. How does His example shape your prayer life? This is a discipline that we can develop!

Gracious Holy Spirit, so much of my life seems to revolve around my interests and my welfare. I would like to live just one day in which everything I did benefited someone besides myself. Perhaps prayer for others is a starting point. Help me to do so without any need for praise or reward. In Jesus’ name. Amen.1

 
 
 
 
 
 

1. Richard Foster, Prayer, the Heart’s True Home, pg. 201

Prayer Practicum: Contemplative Prayer

Prayer Practicum: Contemplative Prayer Sermon Audio Here

John 15:1-10

THIS IS ABIDING: Joining With Jesus

John 15:1-10 our Big Idea from this text is in verses 4&5: “remain in me” – what does it mean to “remain” in Jesus? The tense in the Greek is CONSTATIVE: a Solemn Command “Make this your top priority” Jesus wants to MAKE SURE we understand the importance, the GRAVITY of His command to remain or abide in him. And like gravity, this is pulling at us ALL THE TIME.

James 4:8: Come near to God and he will come near to you.

~ God doesn’t change; when we approach, He comes into focus

John 17:21: that all of them may be one, Father, just as you are in me and I am in you.

~ Unity with God is the goal; more of Him, less of us

SO: How Do We Abide In Christ?

Two Active Preparations

  1. Loving the Lord: Zephaniah 3:17: The LORD your God is with you, he is mighty to save. He will take great delight in you, he will quiet you with his love, he will rejoice over you with singing.”
    ~ RECEIVE God’s Love for you – you are worth it BECAUSE God has chosen you!
    In Proverbs 8:17: I love those who love me, and those who seek me find me.
    ~ Give God Love – Love Him Back
  2. Purifying the heart: Psalms 24:3-4: Who may ascend the hill of the LORD? Who may stand in his holy place? He who has clean hands and a pure heart, who does not lift up his soul to an idol or swear by what is false.
    ~ Just like a lover will spurn all others to declare dedication to their loved one, so we must let go of anything that stands in the way of our love for God. God wants and deserves first place in our lives.

Two Passive Preparations

  1. Still the Soul: Psalms 131:2 But I have stilled and quieted my soul; like a weaned child with its mother, like a weaned child is my soul within me.
    ~ We surrender to Christ’s control, and let Him calm the Spirit within us.
  2. Listen for the Whisper: Jeremiah 30:21: Their leader will be one of their own; their ruler will arise from among them. I will bring him near and he will come close to me, for who is he who will devote himself to be close to me?’ declares the LORD.
    ~ Who is doing the drawing? The Lord!
    ~ Who is engaging in the process? WE ARE

Just like a plant grafting being changed from the inside out, THAT is what God does in us… but remember, the process takes TIME. We can’t rush it, but we can recognize what’s happening, and lean into it.

My little photobooth app for Linux

(Here’s yet another Linux entry that I’m posting to remind me of what I’ve done to solve a problem. If you’re a regular reader of my sermon blog, this entry might not make sense to you.)

outputEvery year our church hosts a Harvest Carnival for the neighborhood children on whichever Sunday night is closest to Halloween. We have a sit down meal for families, lots of carnival games, and more than enough candy to send any twelve diabetics into a coma. Fun times.

One of the events we offer is a photo booth, where the kids come and strike cheesy poses in their costumes, and then they get a photo strip for a souvenir. To RENT a photo booth that does this is expensive, and besides – we already OWN a computer and a printer. It must be a simple matter to set it up to fulfill that function, right?

Yes. So simple, in fact, that I forget to save the work that I’ve done on this year after year. I end up hacking this together FROM SCRATCH every year. No more. I’m saving my work here for future reference.

Since I use Linux, it’s a matter of gathering the tools, and figuring out how to chain them together to make them do what I want: to result in this filmstrip format shown here. That means I have to make sure I have the physical equipment as well as the software. Here’s the shopping list, as it were:

  • computer (using the church laptop)
  • printer (I normally use the color laser printer, but it wasn’t working: enter a cheap HP inkjet)
  • bright light (an old overhead projector works well here)
  • webcam (Logitech USB, not the one on the laptop)

And then there’s the software to pull it all together:

  • Cheese (webcam software)
  • ImageMagick (to manipulate the images taken)
  • gtkdialog (an old school graphic user interface scripting tool – to make it all pretty)

Now that I’ve got all those tools installed, I write three scripts to make them dance. The main script that does the work I call “mycheesyphotoboothscript”:

#!/bin/sh
mv ~/Pictures/Webcam/*.jpg ~/Pictures/Webcam/2016backup
mv ~/Pictures/Webcam/*.png ~/Pictures/Webcam/2016backup
cheese
cd ~/Pictures/Webcam/
convert 2016*.jpg[400x400] -splice 0x10 -background "#ffffff" -append -crop -0+10 output.png
lpr -o fit-to-page -PHP_ENVY_4520 output.png

All of the photographs taken by Cheese are placed in the Pictures/Webcam subdirectory of my Home. So, the first two lines move any existing photos to a backup directory (~/Pictures/Webcam/2016backup).

Next, the Chesse program is started. I then aim the camera, turn on the lights, make funny faces to get good shots… and when I have three or four good shots, I **close** the Cheese program. That tells the script to do the NEXT commands, which is to move into the Pictures/Webcam directory.

Next, we CONVERT the existing pictures just taken into a single vertical strip named “output.png”.

Finally, we send that file to the printer with the LPR command, making sure it fits on the page.

When I use this program next year, I’ll have to change the printer name from HP_ENVY_4520 to whatever printer I’m using.

The other scripts are really just for housekeeping/ease of use. I create a pretty launcher script called “PhotoBooth”:

#! /bin/bash

export MAIN_DIALOG='
<window title="PictureBooth-O-Matic" icon-name="gtk-preferences" resizable="true" decorated="true">
 <vbox>
 <hbox>
 <vbox>
 <hbox>
 <button>
 <label>"Cheese"</label>
 <input file>"/usr/share/icons/Moka/64x64/apps/cheese.png"</input>
 <action>mycheesyphotoboothscript</action>
 </button>
 </hbox>
 </vbox>
 <vbox>
 <hbox>
 <button>
 <label>"Close"</label>
 <input file>"/usr/share/icons/Moka/64x64/actions/exit.png"</input>
 <action>EXIT:close</action>
 </button>
 </hbox>
 </vbox>
 </hbox>
 </vbox>
</window>
'
gtkdialog --program MAIN_DIALOG

Which gives me this: cheezy

And finally, to make sure I can FIND the program, I write a little launcher that makes it show up in my menus. In Linuxland, we call these .desktop files, and here’s the PhotoBooth.desktop file:

[Desktop Entry]
Name=Cheezy PhotoBooth
Comment=create photo booth strips
Exec=/home/ed/Programs/MyBinaries/PhotoBooth
Icon=/home/ed/.local/share/icons/Moka/64x64/apps/cheese.png
Terminal=false
Type=Application
Categories=Graphics;
StartupNotify=true
MimeType=application/x-ms-dos-executable
NoDisplay=false

Hope that helps someone (and reminds me to NOT erase all this work so I don’t have to do this from scratch next year).

Prayer Practicum: Unceasing Prayer

Prayer Practicum: Unceasing Prayer Sermon Audio Here

Ephesians 6:18-20

New Yankee Workshop-Norm Abram had every tool; Dick Proenneke had a few hand tools, and made every other tool he needed. What tools do we use in prayer? Our challenge is to

Expand Our Prayer Toolbox With

Breath Prayer

  • Luke 18:13 is the example of the most well known “breath prayer”
  • Not formal, not fancy, but definitely got the job done.
  • In Psalm 130:1, the first verse reveals a gut-level response to life:
  • Ever feel like you’re so far lost, you won’t possibly find your way out? Cry out for help!
  • SW: Think of short phrases that you “send up as a flare” prayer; Resolve to use them!

Presence Prayer

Brother Lawrence, wrote, “the most excellent method he had found of going to GOD, was that of doing our common business without any view of pleasing men, and (as far as we are capable) purely for the love of GOD.”

  • Galatians 1:10 ~ When we serve, we remind ourselves: THIS IS FOR GOD.
  • Ephesians 6:5-6 ~ As we serve, we think of God’s presence, and we PRAY IN RESPONSE

“As he proceeded in his work, he continued his familiar conversation with his Maker, imploring His grace, and offering to Him all his actions.” ~ Brother Lawrence

  • If we were able to offer everything we did, no matter the context, as an offering to God, how would that affect our prayer life?

Steps Into Unceasing Prayer

  • The first step is outward discipline. A concert musician might make their performance seem effortless, but consider how much time was spent practicing scales. Ask yourself: what concrete disciplines could you use to commune with God in prayer?
  • The next step is mental discipline. What examples do you see in Psalm 119:9-16?
  • The third step is “splanchna” – gut-level change.
  • Consider Colossians 3:12 as an ongoing example for us ~

We MAKE THE CHOICE what we will “put on” in prayer. And we make this choice EVERY DAY.

“’O Lord, my Lord, how excellent is your name in all the earth.’ The Pleiades and Orion sing your praise. Sparrows and chickadees mimic their song. All creation seems in harmony with you, the Master Conductor. All, that is, except me. Why? Why do I alone want to sing my own melody? I certainly am a stubborn creature. Forgive me.
I do desire to come into harmony with you more fully and more often. I do desire a fellowship that is constant and sustaining. Please nurture this desire of mine, which seems so small and tentative right now. May I someday become like the trees, which are ‘planted by streams of water, which yield their fruit in its season, and their leaves do not whither. In all they do, they prosper.’ For Jesus’ sake. –Amen.”1

 
 
 
 
 
 

1. Richard Foster, Prayer, the Heart’s True Home, pg. 129

Prayer Practicum: Covenant Prayer

Prayer Practicum: Covenant Prayer Sermon Audio Here

Galatians 3:15-20

In a contract, we exchange promises; in a covenant, we give OURSELVES to each other; God GAVE Himself for us (John 1:1, 14), and we are to give ourselves to God (Romans 12:1). Let’s look at four aspects of

Our Response-Abilities in Covenant Prayer

We Respond in Obedience ~

  • John 13:36-38 – Not just promises
  • Peter makes promises; how does that play out?
  • Instead, 1 Peter 1:2 tells us we have been chosen for obedience
  • 2 John 1:6 ~ Christian love IS to walk in obedience to Christ
  • So What? Jer. 29:12 God WANTS us to pray; when we pray, we obey

We Respond with Time ~

  • Acts 3:1 – notice the reference to the TIME of prayer
  • Psalm 5:1-3 – What time do you see here?
  • 1 Thes. 5:17 – challenge to pray always
  • So What? make and keep regular appointments with God in prayer

We Respond With a Place ~

  • Acts 16:13-16 – a formal place of prayer; how formal is YOURS?
  • 1 Kings 8:27-29 – How does this “place” affect prayer?
  • Matthew 14:23 – How does Jesus’ example affect ours?
  • So What? the LOCATION doesn’t matter; Pick a place to pray!

We Respond With Heart Preparation ~

  • Habakkuk 2:20 – how do we prepare for God’s presence?
  • Psalm 103:1 – how does this interact with Hab. 2:20?
  • So What? ask yourself: are you “all in” in prayer? what’s holding you back?

“Blessed Savior, I pace back and forth at the altar of commitment. I really do want a fixed habit of prayer. At least, that is what I want right now. I’m not sure if that is what I will want two weeks from now. I do know that without some kind of consistent communion with you I will not know holy obedience. So, as best I can, I promise to set aside time regularly for prayer, meditation, and spiritual reading. Strengthen me in this covenant. Help me to so delight in your presence that I will want to come home to you often. In your name and for your sake I make this covenant. Amen.”1

 
 
 
 
 

1. Richard Foster, Prayer, the Heart’s True Home, pg. 77


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